Author Topic: Computer Overheating => How to Know & What to do? Intel,AMD CPU  (Read 1109 times)

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Online zeal

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How do I know if my computer is overheating?

note   :
Intel® Processors have built-in thermal protection. If the processor gets too hot, the built-in protection shuts down the computer. If your computer is not over-clocked and is running under the design specifications, the built-protection can help prevent damage to your system.

Unusual fan sounds:
Most computers have two fans; one that cools the power supply and one that cools the processor. If a fan starts to make unusual whirring, clicking, clunking, or a musical sound or beep, the fan might be failing. If the fan is the problem, always replace, never repair.

Blue screen:
If a fan does fail, the computer might boot up properly but then start to overheat. The most common result is a blue screen. If you keep getting a Windows* error and a blue screen, check the cooling fan and the air flow coming or going from your computer.

Constantly reboots or shut down:
To prevent damage to components, the computer shuts down or reboots if it senses an overheating issue. The system might reboot every few minutes until the problem is resolved. This often occurs if your system CPU is over-clocked, sped up past the recommended speed limits. The BIOS usually reports if a thermal event has occurred.

Non-fan-based CPU overheating:
When a CPU overheats with all fans working (assuming all cleaning, location, and environmental temperature recommendations are met), you might need to replace the thermal compound between the heatsink and processor. The existing compound eventually hardens with time on most systems.

See a computer technician or buy a professional grade thermal compound and replace it yourself, carefully following all instructions and warnings.

High temperature:

If you use a third party software to measure the temperature or the BIOS readings, contact the software vendor to ensure the software is validated to work with your processor.



What do I do if my computer is overheating?

If your computer is overheating and it was recently built, the following tips may resolve your issue:

Check the Fan/Heatsink. Is it properly installed?

Are the push pins in the correct position and is the heatsink securely attached to the socket/motherboard?
Are you using the recommended fan/heatsink for your boxed processor?
If you are using the fan/heatsink that came in the box with your Intel® Boxed Processor, you have the correct one.
Is there Thermal Interface Material (TIM) on the bottom of the heatsink?
Intel® heatsinks have thermal material on them from the factory. If you need additional Thermal Interface Material, and have a boxed processor that is still within the warranty period of three years, contact Intel® customer support for TIM.
Procedure to replace Thermal Interface Material (TIM).
Airflow is not blocked. Move cables or other hardware that may block airflow.
Do not use more fans than are required for your chassis. More is not better.
Update the BIOS. Verify you have the latest BIOS and update it if needed.

You can identify your current BIOS version by looking at the BIOS string, which appears during boot-up. You can also display the BIOS version by entering BIOS setup by pressing "F2" during system boot-up. The main page of the BIOS setup includes the BIOS version string. For Intel® Motherboards - example, the version string GB85010A.86A.0046.P05 identifies the BIOS version as P05.
Correct Chassis. Do you have the correct chassis for the processor? A list of test chassis is available in the Thermally Advantaged Chassis List.
If your computer is overheating and it was running fine, the following tips may resolve your issue:

Check the Fan/Heatsink.

Is it damaged?
Are there any cracks or missing pieces?
Check the push pins for damage and reset them to the original position and reinstall.
Clean the fins on the heatsink if you see dust. (Using a can of Compressed Air/Gas Duster)
If the Thermal Interface Material has become dried and flaky, replace it with Thermally Conductive Compound (also referred to as Thermal Grease or Thermal Compound).
Are all your fans operational?
Carefully inspect that fans are plugged into the motherboard headers and spinning when system is turned on.
Loose or Damaged Cables. Are there any hard drive cables that may have come loose and are blocking the air flow?
Airflow is not blocked. Move cables or other hardware that may block airflow.
Do not use more fans then are required for your chassis. More is not better.

sourced from http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-029426.htm
« Last Edit: July 26, 2012, 08:45:36 PM by obasimiracle »
zealous for perfection

Online zeal

  • Lead Admin
  • *****
Re: Computer Overheating => How to Know & What to do? Intel CPU
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2012, 08:42:33 PM »

How do I know if my computer is overheating?

note   :
Intel® Processors have built-in thermal protection. If the processor gets too hot, the built-in protection shuts down the computer. If your computer is not over-clocked and is running under the design specifications, the built-protection can help prevent damage to your system.

Unusual fan sounds:
Most computers have two fans; one that cools the power supply and one that cools the processor. If a fan starts to make unusual whirring, clicking, clunking, or a musical sound or beep, the fan might be failing. If the fan is the problem, always replace, never repair.

Blue screen:
If a fan does fail, the computer might boot up properly but then start to overheat. The most common result is a blue screen. If you keep getting a Windows* error and a blue screen, check the cooling fan and the air flow coming or going from your computer.

Constantly reboots or shut down:
To prevent damage to components, the computer shuts down or reboots if it senses an overheating issue. The system might reboot every few minutes until the problem is resolved. This often occurs if your system CPU is over-clocked, sped up past the recommended speed limits. The BIOS usually reports if a thermal event has occurred.

Non-fan-based CPU overheating:
When a CPU overheats with all fans working (assuming all cleaning, location, and environmental temperature recommendations are met), you might need to replace the thermal compound between the heatsink and processor. The existing compound eventually hardens with time on most systems.

See a computer technician or buy a professional grade thermal compound and replace it yourself, carefully following all instructions and warnings.

High temperature:

If you use a third party software to measure the temperature or the BIOS readings, contact the software vendor to ensure the software is validated to work with your processor.



What do I do if my computer is overheating?

If your computer is overheating and it was recently built, the following tips may resolve your issue:

Check the Fan/Heatsink. Is it properly installed?

Are the push pins in the correct position and is the heatsink securely attached to the socket/motherboard?
Are you using the recommended fan/heatsink for your boxed processor?
If you are using the fan/heatsink that came in the box with your Intel® Boxed Processor, you have the correct one.
Is there Thermal Interface Material (TIM) on the bottom of the heatsink?
Intel® heatsinks have thermal material on them from the factory. If you need additional Thermal Interface Material, and have a boxed processor that is still within the warranty period of three years, contact Intel® customer support for TIM.
Procedure to replace Thermal Interface Material (TIM).
Airflow is not blocked. Move cables or other hardware that may block airflow.
Do not use more fans than are required for your chassis. More is not better.
Update the BIOS. Verify you have the latest BIOS and update it if needed.

You can identify your current BIOS version by looking at the BIOS string, which appears during boot-up. You can also display the BIOS version by entering BIOS setup by pressing "F2" during system boot-up. The main page of the BIOS setup includes the BIOS version string. For Intel® Motherboards - example, the version string GB85010A.86A.0046.P05 identifies the BIOS version as P05.
Correct Chassis. Do you have the correct chassis for the processor? A list of test chassis is available in the Thermally Advantaged Chassis List.
If your computer is overheating and it was running fine, the following tips may resolve your issue:

Check the Fan/Heatsink.

Is it damaged?
Are there any cracks or missing pieces?
Check the push pins for damage and reset them to the original position and reinstall.
Clean the fins on the heatsink if you see dust. (Using a can of Compressed Air/Gas Duster)
If the Thermal Interface Material has become dried and flaky, replace it with Thermally Conductive Compound (also referred to as Thermal Grease or Thermal Compound).
Are all your fans operational?
Carefully inspect that fans are plugged into the motherboard headers and spinning when system is turned on.
Loose or Damaged Cables. Are there any hard drive cables that may have come loose and are blocking the air flow?
Airflow is not blocked. Move cables or other hardware that may block airflow.
Do not use more fans then are required for your chassis. More is not better.

sourced from http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-029426.htm


You can as well do the following to control your laptop / desktop from overheating and staying cool on the go

Check (and Clean) Your Fans

When you feel your computer getting hot, put your hand next to the computer's fan vents. If you feel hot air blowing out of them, then your fan is working, but if you only feel a little bit of air, it could be your fan is built up with dust or is otherwise not working. If you're comfortable opening up your computer, you can unscrew the case, find the fan, and blow it out with some compressed air (or replace it, if it's just broken completely).

Keep It Out of Hot Weather

Even if your computer doesn't regularly overheat, summer temperatures above 95° Fahrenheit are likely to cause problems, from damaging your battery to making your hard drive expand and more. When possible, keep it in the shade and out of the sweltering heat.

Use a Lap Desk

Your laptop is designed to sit on a flat surface. Those little rubber feet on the bottom are supposed to lift it off the ground just enough to get a bit of airflow underneath the computer, and when you put your laptop on your lap, you restrict that airflow, transferring all that heat to your legs instead (ouch). sitting Indian style can help, but a much better solution is to get a lap desk. They don't need to be expensive; we've shared a ton of DIY options here before, and they'll not only keep your computer cool, but they'll keep your legs from getting burned, too. And, with all that airflow, it might keep your fans from running at full speed, keeping everything a bit quieter.

Control Your Fan Speeds

While the above should be sufficient, you can take slightly more intense measures to cool your machine off, if desired. A great way to keep everything cool is to install a program like SpeedFan (for Windows) or smcFanControl (for OS X). You can read more about fine-tuning your fan control in this how-to. Just know that it isn't necessary to keep your computer safe, but is good if you'd rather keep your computer loud and cool rather than quiet and hot to the touch.


Take any other precaution

games eat up more processing power than any other regular app it is advisable to control the number of simultaneous applications you allow to run at a time as they can add more pressure to your computer process ability. you also control internet games and other web flash  stuff.
zealous for perfection

Offline DE_Light

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Re: Computer Overheating => How to Know & What to do? Intel,AMD CPU
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2012, 04:52:49 AM »
Gud tipz keep it up


 


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